Tag Archives: SureSmile

Tipton Orthodontics Has A Fun New Soda Pop Quiz

sodaTipton Orthodontics wants to know, where does all that soda pop go?

On average, the typical person consumes over 50 gallons of soda pop per year! The amount of acid and sugar found in a can of soda can cause serious tooth decay and lead to cavities, gum disease, and even tooth loss!

We at Tipton Orthodontics know that you don’t want to lose your teeth, so take the soda pop quiz, presented by the Minnesota Dental Association, and learn more about how to keep your smile healthy.

It’s a fun interactive quiz, so enjoy! From Tipton Orthodontics.

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Gummy Tummy from Tipton Orthodontics

bubblegumWe know the rumors going around – mostly among young people – that once you swallow a piece of chewing gum it will stake a claim and take up residency in your stomach for at least seven years!  We really hate to take all the fun out of the mystery, but the truth is that chewing gum, when swallowed, will enter the stomach and move through the digestive system just like any other piece of food and leave the body long before seven years!  So, if you ever have accidentally swallowed a piece of gum, there is no need to worry!

This being said, gum does not have any dietary benefits, so while it’s not harmful to swallow, you still want to avoid swallowing it.  If you are a gum-chewer, make sure you chew sugarless gum, because gum with sugar can lead to cavities.  Sugarless gum still has the same amount of flavor, but with less cavity causing ingredients.  You see, when the bacterium in your mouth breaks down sugar, what’s left behind is acid. This acid eats away at the enamel coating of your teeth, causing holes that we call cavities.  Cavities can lead to other long term mouth problems if they are not treated in time, so it is best to try and avoid overexposing your teeth to too many harmful substances!

Happy (sugar-free) gum chewing from Tipton Orthodontics!

When Are Two Phases

Usually patients in orthodontic treatment already have their permanent teeth – but in some cases we have to start treatment earlier, even before the patient’s permanent teeth come in. We call this “two-phase treatment.”

When we have patients with clear developmental problems at an early age, it’s best to start work when they are young, before the problems get bigger and more difficult to treat. Examples include an upper or lower jaw that is not growing correctly, or a mouth growing in a way that doesn’t leave enough room for all the permanent teeth to come in.

In these cases we will start early and do one round of treatment – phase one – while the patient still has “baby teeth.” Phase one usually does not involve braces, but can include a different type of appliance that helps the jaw grow into place properly, such as a retainer. We’ll follow up with phase two usually a few years later, when permanent the patient’s permanent teeth have come in. Phase two often does involve braces and sometimes headgear.

In order to catch early problems, we recommend that children have an orthodontic check-up no later than age seven (and so does the American Association of Orthodontics). However, if your dentist or pediatrician sees any sign that early treatment might be necessary, he or she may recommend your child visit an orthodontist even sooner.  For more information about two-phase orthodontics, or to schedule a consultation with Dr. Tipton, give us a call at Tipton Orthodontics. little-girls

When is Thumb-Sucking Cause for Worry? Dr. Tipton Answers Your Questions

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Lots of you have asked us at Dr. Tipton’s office about whether it’s healthy for children to suck thumbs (or, less frequently, fingers). If you’ve got a thumb-sucker in the house, you are not alone. Research tells us that between 75% and 95% of infants suck their thumbs. Is this anything to worry about?

In most cases, no. Sucking is a natural reflex for an infant, and can provide security and contentment as well as relaxation for your little one. It’s a habit that most children grow out of between the ages of 2 and 4.

However, if your child keeps sucking after he’s gotten his permanent teeth, it’s time to take a closer look. If your child sucks his thumb aggressively, putting pressure on the inside of his mouth or his teeth, it could cause problems with tooth alignment and proper mouth growth. If you’re worried, give us a call and we will help assess the situation, and provide tips for how to help your child break the habit. Give us a call at Dr. Tipton’s Office!

SureSmile at Tipton Orthodontics

suresmileWOW! What an exciting time at Tipton Orthodontics! With the introduction of SureSmile into the practice everyone is excited about the results we are seeing and about our patients getting their braces off sooner.

Dr. Tipton is so excited he hosted an open house for approximately 20 dentists and their staffs. The event included a luncheon, demonstrations of a SureSmile scan, and review of the SureSmile software.

If you are not familiar with what SureSmile is here’s a little background information. After the initial leveling and aligning of the teeth is done (approximately 3-6 months) a 3-D digital scan is done of the teeth. Next, Dr. Tipton uses these images to plan treatment digitally for greater accuracy and control. Finally, specialized robots use his plan to produce customized high-tech wires for use in the patient’s braces.

So now you know why we are so excited about SureSmile! If you have any questions regarding this exciting technology just give us a call at Tipton Orthodontics.

A Visit From The Tad Fairy at Tipton Orthodontics

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At Tipton Orthodontics, we were fortunate enough to have Dr. John Graham, one of Arizona’s leaders in the use and placement of temporary anchorage devices (or tads), come to our office to train us on the procedure. Dr. Graham lectures on the placement of tads to doctors across the country. He also has a patent on the tads we will be using in our office.

Tads are mini-screws which are positioned in strategic locations in a patients upper and/or lower jaw to aid in the ideal positioning of the teeth. The placement and removal of tads can be done using local anesthetic but WITHOUT the use of needles. Most patients return to work or school upon leaving the office with minimal to no descomfort. In some cases, the use of tads helps correct bites that could otherwise require orthognathic surgery. Thanks again to Dr. Graham for sharing his expertise with our staff. At Tipton Orthodontics, we are excited to bring this procedure to the forefront of orthodontics for our patients.

BRACES 101: The different parts of your braces — Tipton Orthodontics

Not only is it important to know how your braces work, but also should you ever need to call our office in case you sustain any damage to your braces, we can help you more effectively if you can tell us exactly which piece is in trouble! Here’s a handy diagram and corresponding list of all the parts that make up your braces.

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Elastic Tie: Tiny rubber band that fits around the bracket to hold the archwire in place.

Archwire: The main wire that acts as a track to guide the teeth along. It’s changed periodically throughout treatment, as teeth move to their new positions.

Loop in Archwire: Frequently used for closing space left by an extraction. Many archwires don’t have a loop.

Bracket: Small attachment that holds the archwire in place. Most often, a bracket is cemented directly onto the tooth’s surface, eliminating the need for a band.

Headgear Tube: Round, hollow attachment on the back bands. The inner bow of the headgear fits into it.

Coil Spring: Fits between brackets and over archwire to open space between teeth.

Tie Wire: Fine wire that is twisted around the bracket to hold the archwire in place.

Band: A thin ring of metal fitted around a tooth and cemented in place. The band provides a way to attach the brackets to the tooth.

Hook: Welded or removable arm to which elastics (rubber bands) are attached.

Elastic (Rubber Band): Small rubber band that is hooked between different points on the appliance to provide pressure to move the teeth.

Call us at Tipton Orthodontics if you have any questions about your braces or want to see if treatment is right for you.